Posts Tagged ‘Bedford MA’

Forewarned is Forearmed: Top 6 Investment Property Repairs

When you first look into whether an investment property in Bedford would be a suitable addition to your own portfolio, the positives leap out. Bedford investment properties can throw off positive cash flow even as they appreciate in long-term value. What’s not to like? But there is one area that may hover as a wildcard: the maintenance issue.

Because tenants are part of the picture, Bedford investment properties undergo varying amounts of wear and tear, so keeping them in top shape does require at least some degree of attention. Veteran landlords learn how to handle maintenance and repairs with a minimum of turmoil—sometimes by simply farming them out to professional property managers. In that, we are fortunate—Bedford has some great ones!

However you choose to address the issue, it’s useful to know which repairs investment property owners say are most frequently needed. Here are six leaders:

  1. Leaks. Under sinks, under windows and in the ceiling, leaks require the swiftest action to forestall expensive repercussions. Even the smallest leaks can result in mold growth, so any hint of water where it doesn’t belong rates immediate attention.
  2. Appliances. They have the greatest number of working parts, so it’s no surprise that they wind up having the greatest number of non-working parts. Repairmen are whispering that current models in almost all brands are not holding up as well as they used to…so when replacements are necessary, consider that higher-quality models may be worth the initial expense.
  3. Water heater. Tenants deserve hot water, so when it peters out, having the attention of a veteran plumber can be the difference between a repair (often all that’s needed) or a more expensive replacement.
  4. Rodents and bugs. Sealing up holes is the first line of defense for discouraging all manner of creepy-crawlies. If they show up anyway, Bedford pest control experts can usually rid infestations for at most a few hundred dollars.
  5. Furnace. If the heat goes out during cold spells, unless it’s only a pilot light going out, it can quickly become an emergency situation. You’ll want to have the emergency phone number for one of Bedford’s experienced furnace repairmen at the ready.
  6. Running toilet. We’re all familiar with the sound of a toilet that won’t shut up. It’s usually (in fact, virtually always) due to a “flapper” that doesn’t quite seat properly. These are inexpensive parts that are easily replaced—but there are also a hundred different varieties. All the expertise that’s required to fix this common tenant complaint can be found in YouTube videos demonstrating the various 10-minutes solutions.

Some terrific Bedford investment property possibilities are among this fall’s listings. Call me to explore them!

Joan Parcewski, Realtor & Notary

LAER Realty Partners           http://www.JoanParcewski.LAERRealty.com

JParcewski@LAERRealty.com    cell 978-376-3978

 

Joan Parcewski Full Picture 102017Laer Realty Partners

 

 

Bedford MA – Seniors Cultivate Earth-Friendly Values

I am always looking for stories about communities.  Many times people are looking to move into a community and these stories help them decide if the community is the right fit for their family.  Bedford lies next to the towns of Lexington, Burlington, and Concord.

This is a great story in the Boston Globe by correspondent Nancy Shoehet West who talks about a wonderful senior community – Carleton Willard that sits on the grounds of a former farm.  You can read the full piece at http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2012/05/13/bedford_seniors_demonstrate_that_the_environmental_movement_isnt_only_for_the_young/?page=1

Among the approximately 350 residents in their 70s, 80s, and beyond living at the continuing care retirement community of Carleton-Willard Village in Bedford, suggestions from their adult children are a frequent topic of conversation.

But resident Peggy McKibben  may command a little bit more attention than some of her peers when she passes along wisdom from her son, especially if the topic is sustainability or conservation. She is the mother of renowned environmental activist and writer Bill McKibben, author of numerous books including “The End of Nature,”“Enough,” and most recently “Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet.”

Bill McKibben is also the founder of 350.org, an international initiative to raise awareness about climate change and reduce carbon emissions to slow the rate of global warming.

A few months ago, when Peggy McKibben read about an event that 350.org was planning for May 5 called “Connect the Dots,” with projects and rallies scheduled worldwide, she knew that several of her friends at Carleton-Willard Village would want to participate with her.

“The idea behind ‘Connect the Dots’ is to map out the world using red dots to show the dramatic damage caused by catastrophic events related to climate change, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and tsunamis, and using green dots to show the ways in which people are practicing sustainable living,” Peggy McKibben explained.

It wasn’t the first time that a group from the retirement community had undertaken an environmental initiative.

In October 2010, when 350.org promoted its first major climate impact awareness day, residents at Carleton-Willard established the center’s composting program, which is still thriving today.

McKibben sent out an e-mail to gauge interest in “Connect the Dots,” and then held called a meeting.

Several who showed up were enthusiastic gardeners. Carleton-Willard already offers residents and staff access to individual garden plots. The group came up with an idea: What if they joined together in a gardening project, one that could eventually provide food for their own community?

After a little bit more discussion, the concept solidified: The group would plant cherry tomatoes, with the goal of serving their harvest in the Carleton-Willard dining halls later this summer.

Carleton-Willard staff responded enthusiastically: chief executive Barbara Doyle applauded the idea, and the buildings and grounds workers said they would help with tilling and other jobs requiring heavy lifting.

Those who assembled for the meeting were quick to find ways they could pitch in. Mary Waters Shepley offered her own garden plot for the project, and found a collection of tomato hoops they could use. Esther Braun,  the informal overseer of Carleton-Willard’s composting program, said she would ensure the garden would have an ample supply of enriched soil from her project.

“We all consider ourselves environmentalists, and we’re all very committed to making Carleton-Willard be as much of a community as possible,” McKibben said. “We also thought it was going to be a fun thing to do together.”Continued…

Hanscom to Celebrate Arbor Day – April 27th –

The following information was taken from the Hanscom Air Force Base website http://www.hanscom.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123298493 and was written by Nick Bonard Civil Engineering on 4/18/2012

For the 25th consecutive year, Hanscom is celebrating Arbor Day with a tree planting ceremony organized by 66th Air Base Group Civil Engineering.
This year, Hanscom will plant two pear trees along Eglin Street. Their location will continue last year’s efforts to transform Eglin Street into a tree-lined avenue. The new trees will provide shade, color and numerous environmental benefits to the area, according to CE.
Traditionally, Arbor Day is held on the last Friday in April and is meant to celebrate all the ways in which trees enrich people’s lives. Trees at Hanscom help to clean the air, conserve soil, moderate temperature and bring nature into a person’s daily life. Trees are a vital component of the base’s infrastructure, providing both environmental and economic benefits.
Arbor Day also provides an opportunity for participants to act on the lessons of environmental stewardship by planting trees that can be enjoyed by many generations to come.
This year’s tree planting ceremony will take place on Friday, April 27, at 1 p.m., rain or shine, on the east side of Eglin Street, across from the clinic. To help celebrate the event, all personnel working at Hanscom are invited to attend alongside local youth from Hanscom Middle School and Col. Stacy L. Yike, 66th Air Base Group commander.
For further information about Arbor Day or the tree planting ceremony, call            781-225-2942.

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