Archive for the ‘Lexington MA’ Category

The Rich History Behind the Lexington Golf Club

The following article comes from Wicked Local Lexington (August 28th) – “Lexington Golf Club has storied history”………… 

The annals of Lexington’s history are rich with many tales — some known to  only a few. One of those little known tales is the story of the Lexington Golf Club.

Founded in 1895, it operated out of an old barn on what was then the Monroe  property. The nine holes were much shorter, and as cows and horses were pastured  on the land it was necessary to fence the putting greens with wire and posts. A  ground rule was established that a ball hitting a wire could be played over  again. When the owners of the land complained that the players were annoying the  animals, the executive committee requested the club members be more mindful of  the animals when playing the course. But, use of the course by both two- and  four-legged animals became more contentious and the course was eventually moved  from the Monroe pasture to its present location on what was then the Vaille farm  in North Lexington (presently 55 Hill St.).

At that time many Lexington residences were summer homes and a significant  number of the club members were from the city of Boston. Announcement of most  scheduled golf events included the Boston to Lexington train schedules and  arrangements were made to meet players at the train station and transport them  to the course by horse drawn carriage.

The Golf Club did not hire a full-time professional until 1920. Instead, a  golf professional was hired from time to time to visit the club to give lessons  to those who had signed up for the service. In 1906, additional land was  purchased and improvements were begun that have continued to this day.  In  the early days there were also tennis courts and families enjoyed swimming in  the spring-fed pond near the second hole. Now Lexington Golf Club is strictly  for golf and the social gatherings associated with the sport.

Membership applications are being accepted and a lottery will be held on  Oct. 18 to determine the order of acceptance as openings become available. The  club permits about 300 playing members, which is a number that offers a good  flow of play at the nine-hole course.

New members pay an entry fee currently of $7,500 and annual dues of from  $800 to $3,500 depending on the type of membership.  The club employs a  full-time teaching professional and course superintendent. During the year, the  club hosts a number of local tournaments including those for the Lexington Chamber of Commerce and Lexington Historical Society.

Each new applicant needs to be sponsored by two regular members of the club  who will assist with the process and help the new potential members become  acquainted with the course. Current regular members are being encouraged to  bring new members to the Lexington Golf Club.

For more information, contact Bob Bicknell, club secretary and membership  chair, at mabicknells@rcn.com or go to lexingtongc.com.

The annals of Lexington’s history are rich with many tales — some known to  only a few. One of those little known tales is the story of the Lexington Golf Club.

Founded in 1895, it operated out of an old barn on what was then the Monroe  property. The nine holes were much shorter, and as cows and horses were pastured  on the land it was necessary to fence the putting greens with wire and posts. A  ground rule was established that a ball hitting a wire could be played over  again. When the owners of the land complained that the players were annoying the  animals, the executive committee requested the club members be more mindful of  the animals when playing the course. But, use of the course by both two- and  four-legged animals became more contentious and the course was eventually moved  from the Monroe pasture to its present location on what was then the Vaille farm  in North Lexington (presently 55 Hill St.).

At that time many Lexington residences were summer homes and a significant  number of the club members were from the city of Boston. Announcement of most  scheduled golf events included the Boston to Lexington train schedules and  arrangements were made to meet players at the train station and transport them  to the course by horse drawn carriage.

The Golf Club did not hire a full-time professional until 1920. Instead, a  golf professional was hired from time to time to visit the club to give lessons  to those who had signed up for the service. In 1906, additional land was  purchased and improvements were begun that have continued to this day.  In  the early days there were also tennis courts and families enjoyed swimming in  the spring-fed pond near the second hole. Now Lexington Golf Club is strictly  for golf and the social gatherings associated with the sport.

Membership applications are being accepted and a lottery will be held on  Oct. 18 to determine the order of acceptance as openings become available. The  club permits about 300 playing members, which is a number that offers a good  flow of play at the nine-hole course.

New members pay an entry fee currently of $7,500 and annual dues of from  $800 to $3,500 depending on the type of membership.  The club employs a  full-time teaching professional and course superintendent. During the year, the  club hosts a number of local tournaments including those for the Lexington Chamber of Commerce and Lexington Historical Society.

Each new applicant needs to be sponsored by two regular members of the club  who will assist with the process and help the new potential members become  acquainted with the course. Current regular members are being encouraged to  bring new members to the Lexington Golf Club.

For more information, contact Bob Bicknell, club secretary and membership  chair, at mabicknells@rcn.com or go to lexingtongc.com.

 

See what the visitors see……

Have you ever had someone come to visit and it is your responsibility to show them around?  Suddenly you discover that, though you have lived here all your life, you haven’t really visited the many places in and around MA or sometimes even in and around your town.  Here are a few ideas of things to do.  Some may be season specific – eg baseball – others may be a year round opportunity.  Time to act like a visitor and see what they see. 

Lowell Spinners – affiliate of Boston Red Sox since 1996.  http://www.milb.com/index.jsp?sid=t558  They provide great entertainment for all ages, with theme nights (eg July 13th – Hallowe’en night,  July 25 – JImmy Buffet night,  July 28th – Star Works Day with fireworks,  August 25th – Pirates night).  They also have peanut-free night, bobble head nights and so much more.

For those who want to make it an eat and baseball night, there is always the all you can eat Gatorpit.  For a minimum group size of 10, you and your friends and family are treated grilled steak tips, BBQ ribs, sausages, hot dogs, chicken wings, grilled chicken breast, tossed salad, pasta salad, New England baked beans, corn-on-the-cob,  fruit,  non-alcoholic beverages and  ice cream for dessert. There is also a cash bar for those who are looking for alcohol.  The ticket price includes the meal and seating for the game ($29pp premium box, $28pp box, $25 pp reserved)  Children under 3 free.  Gatorpit goes on rain or shine – even if the game is cancelled.  http://www.milb.com/tickets/page.jsp?ymd=20081223&content_id=490251&vkey=tickets_t558&fext=.jsp&sid=t558

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One of my favorite places to go yearround but especially late spring through early fall is Salem Willows (Salem MA), an historic public park.  Did you know that in 1906 Everett Hobbs & William Eaton served the first ice cream cone in America and “Blind Pat” Kenneally introduced double jointed peanuts from his cart at the Willows?   http://www.salemwillowspark.com/history.html  In addition to the food and the arcades there are also cruises and private charters available www.mahicruises.com  Or maybe you would like to sit back and take a tour of the Witch City  by trolley  www.salemtrolley.com or a high speed catamaran from Salem to Boston www.salemferry.com  or rent a kayak www.kayaksalem.com

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Love literature and its history?  Visit the Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House in Concord (home of her famous “Little Women”).  http://www.louisamayalcott.org/  This year is special as it is their centennial year (1912 – 2012).  There are special events planned including – July 26th “A Morning with the Alcotts”, an interactive tour with old fashioned games, songs, stories and refreshments.  This particular activity runs several times thru July and August.

If you like the Alcott’s don’t miss a trip to Fruitlands in Harvard MA, a discovery of heritage, nature and art.  http://www.fruitlands.org/.  Here again you may find special day program – eg July 26th – How did the stars get in the sky?  (a native American story of the stars).

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While many think of Lexington on Patriots Day, celebrated in April each year, there are activities year round in this historic town tied to the American Revolution.  For the artists there is the Artisans Market that runs July 21st thru August 11th.  For information contact the Lexington Arts & Crafts Society www.LACSma.org,  You can meet the artist and find out the story of their various works.  Admission and parking are free.

These are but a few of what is happening in and around Massachusetts.  Watch for more places to visit and events to enjoy.  Time to start up the car and head out for a day of adventure.  I’ll be back with more places to visit soon.

Joan Parcewski    Woods Real Estate (Billerica MA)   joan@woodsre.com  

978-376-3978    www.JoanParcewski.com

 

 

Proof that Spring Is here – Farmer’s Markets Begin to Spring Up

Fresh fruits and vegetables – speciality items – who doesn’t love the sight of Farmers Markets.

Today – May 29th – the Lexington Farmers Market opened for its 8th season to the sounds of music and tap dancing.

The market will be open on Tuesdays through October from 2pm to 5:30pm at the corner of Mass Ave and Woburn Street.

Lexington’s Farmers’ Market will open for its 8th season this afternoon with music  (Lexington Fife & Drum……) and tap dancing.

And this is only the beginning.  It is only a few short weeks before Billerica’s Farmers Market opens for its 2nd straight year on Monday, June 25th, from 3pm to 7pm on the grounds of the Senior Center right in Billerica Center (www.billericafarmersmarket.org).   Can taste the fresh fish and more that will be available.   

Raytheon “Mathcounts National” Competition Winners from Lexington

So many times businesses aren’t recognized for the support they give within their communities (locally and nationally). In this case Raytheon who has several locations in Massachusetts (including Billerica, Waltham, Tewksbury….) Raytheon, while making a difference with students through its initiatives and other programs that it participates including “Mathcounts”, has found a way to make students interested in the areas that are critical moving forward – math and science.

Just what is “Mathcounts” – check out their website http://mathcounts.org/about where it explains that it is a fun program for middle school students to help them like math.

A Massachusetts team including two Lexington kids and their coach won the National Team Champion title at the 2012 Raytheon MATHCOUNTS National Competition last week….. http://www.boston.com/yourtown/news/lexington/2012/05/three_from_lexington_on_nation.html

For more specifics on how Raytheon is reaching out check our their website http://www.mathmovesu.com/#/home

Bedford MA – Seniors Cultivate Earth-Friendly Values

I am always looking for stories about communities.  Many times people are looking to move into a community and these stories help them decide if the community is the right fit for their family.  Bedford lies next to the towns of Lexington, Burlington, and Concord.

This is a great story in the Boston Globe by correspondent Nancy Shoehet West who talks about a wonderful senior community – Carleton Willard that sits on the grounds of a former farm.  You can read the full piece at http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2012/05/13/bedford_seniors_demonstrate_that_the_environmental_movement_isnt_only_for_the_young/?page=1

Among the approximately 350 residents in their 70s, 80s, and beyond living at the continuing care retirement community of Carleton-Willard Village in Bedford, suggestions from their adult children are a frequent topic of conversation.

But resident Peggy McKibben  may command a little bit more attention than some of her peers when she passes along wisdom from her son, especially if the topic is sustainability or conservation. She is the mother of renowned environmental activist and writer Bill McKibben, author of numerous books including “The End of Nature,”“Enough,” and most recently “Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet.”

Bill McKibben is also the founder of 350.org, an international initiative to raise awareness about climate change and reduce carbon emissions to slow the rate of global warming.

A few months ago, when Peggy McKibben read about an event that 350.org was planning for May 5 called “Connect the Dots,” with projects and rallies scheduled worldwide, she knew that several of her friends at Carleton-Willard Village would want to participate with her.

“The idea behind ‘Connect the Dots’ is to map out the world using red dots to show the dramatic damage caused by catastrophic events related to climate change, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and tsunamis, and using green dots to show the ways in which people are practicing sustainable living,” Peggy McKibben explained.

It wasn’t the first time that a group from the retirement community had undertaken an environmental initiative.

In October 2010, when 350.org promoted its first major climate impact awareness day, residents at Carleton-Willard established the center’s composting program, which is still thriving today.

McKibben sent out an e-mail to gauge interest in “Connect the Dots,” and then held called a meeting.

Several who showed up were enthusiastic gardeners. Carleton-Willard already offers residents and staff access to individual garden plots. The group came up with an idea: What if they joined together in a gardening project, one that could eventually provide food for their own community?

After a little bit more discussion, the concept solidified: The group would plant cherry tomatoes, with the goal of serving their harvest in the Carleton-Willard dining halls later this summer.

Carleton-Willard staff responded enthusiastically: chief executive Barbara Doyle applauded the idea, and the buildings and grounds workers said they would help with tilling and other jobs requiring heavy lifting.

Those who assembled for the meeting were quick to find ways they could pitch in. Mary Waters Shepley offered her own garden plot for the project, and found a collection of tomato hoops they could use. Esther Braun,  the informal overseer of Carleton-Willard’s composting program, said she would ensure the garden would have an ample supply of enriched soil from her project.

“We all consider ourselves environmentalists, and we’re all very committed to making Carleton-Willard be as much of a community as possible,” McKibben said. “We also thought it was going to be a fun thing to do together.”Continued…

Lexington (MA) Town Meeting Approves Zoning Change – A Reprint from Boston Globe – 5/10/12

Whenever you are considering moving to a town, it is always important to keep up on important news.  Each town/city has a different form of government.  In Lexington they have a town meeting form of government.  According to their town website http://ci.lexington.ma.us/towngovernment/abouttm.cfm

Lexington’s Town Meeting is composed of no more than 203 members, including:

  • Elected members: 21 citizens elected from each of nine precincts for three-year staggered terms;
  • At-large members: the Board of Selectmen, Town Counsel, Town Clerk, the School Committee chairman, the Appropriations Committee chairman, and representatives to the General Court (state representatives and state senators);
  • The Town Moderator, elected annually to facilitate all town meeting sessions and preserve order and decorum.

This article appears in today’s Boston Globe – http://www.boston.com/yourtown/news/lexington/2012/05/town_meeting_approves_inn_near.html

 

In a vote that drew an unusually large crowd of spectators, Lexington Town Meeting approved a zoning change Wednesday that will allow the creation of a 22-room inn near the Battle Green.

More than 120 people filled what is usually a near-empty gallery at the meeting in Cary Hall and many of those who remained after 3 ½ hours of debate let out a loud round of applause when Town Meeting voted 138 to 44 in favor of approving the zoning changes.

The vote created a commercial district that will enable Trisha Perez Kennealy to create a 22-room inn called the Inn at Hastings Park located on property at 2027 Massachusetts Ave.

The inn will have a restaurant that seats 54 people and the lodging rooms will be housed in three buildings, including the old Dana retirement home, the Issac Mullikan house and an old Casket Factory.

Many neighbors of the property, which had been zoned for residential use, voiced opposition to the plan, saying it would create traffic, doesn’t offer enough parking and will disrupt what is otherwise a quiet area.

Speaking from the citizen’s gallery above the Town Meeting floor, Carol Rose said the plan for the inn is too big and the use is too intensive for the site.

“Concerns raised by the neighborhood have been largely disregarded in the final plan,” Rose said.

The concerns were echoed by Peter Kelley, the lone selectmen who opposed to the inn. “It does not fit, it does not belong here,” Kelley said.

But after an extensive review of the project and numerous revisions to the plan, the majority of town officials said they are confident the inn will not cause any major disruptions for the neighborhood.

Selectwoman Deb Mauger said if problems arise, they can be addressed every year when the inn must return to the town to renew its license.

The inn will sit less than a half a mile from the Battle Green where the first battle of the Revolutionary War occurred, and Dawn McKenna, chair of the town’s Tourism Committee, said the facility will provide a much-needed place for visitors to stay.

“Can you imagine the marketing opportunity for sleeping in a casket factory?” McKenna said.

 

 

 

Self Guided Walking Tour – The Lexington (MA) Revolutionary Experience

If you haven’t explored Lexington MA, a great way to start is with the self guided walking tour from the Lexington Historical Society.  According to their websitehttp://lhsoc.weebly.com/self-guided-walking-tour-brochure.html, the sites include Buckman Tavern, the Lexington Minuteman Statue, Parker Boulder, the Flagpole, the route to Concord, the Meetinghouse, Belfry Marker, the Revolutionary War Monument and the Frieze. 

Another way to explore Lexington is with the Historic Scavenger Hunt. 

Lexington Scavenger Hunt

Explore Lexington’s historic houses (Buckman Tavern, the Hancock-Clarke

House, and Munroe Tavern), the Battle Green, and Ye Old Burying Ground, and

see if you can answer the 10 questions below. You can

print a copy of this

scavenger hunt

and bring it with you to Lexington when you visit.

How many patriots are buried on Lexington’s

Battle Green?

1.

What is a niddy noddy? 2. Have you seen one?

Name a popular Colonial tavern drink. Do you

know the recipe?

3.

4. What are the “Doolittle Prints” and why are they important?

5. What is a Meeting House? Where was Lexington’s?

Name two men who lived in the same historic house (at

different times) and also share a gravesite.

6.

Can you find the burial site of Captain John Parker? Are you

sure you have the right Captain Parker? How can you tell?

7.

Whose large, round kitchen table is at the Hancock-

Clarke House?

8.

What, or who, was left in Mary Munroe Sanderson’s

bed?

9.

What mark did the British soldiers leave at Munroe

Tavern?

10.

FIRST SHOT: The Lexington Revolutionary Experience | … http://forsdick.com/lhsoc.org/index.php?n=Main.Scaven…

1 of 2 8/18/2009 6:45 AM

Why did the Hancock-Clarke House have wallpaper in

1775 and Buckman Tavern did not?

How was Reverend Jonas Clarke related to the patriot

John Hancock?

Who fired the First Shot of the American Revolution?

It’s all part of the history of Lexington and a fun way to learn the characters that played a part in the Revolutionary War.   

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